Bibliography

Below you will find a living bibliography. This living bibliography will include a range of sources, including audio, audio-visual media, games, novels, monographs, academic articles, and so (so) much more. I have attempted to have some consistency with citations, using the Chicago Manual of Style as my guide. Below are bibliography-style entries, numbered to add some order to the sprawl that will indeed cover this page.

  1. Bell, Madison Smart. Narrative Design: Working with Imagination, Craft, and Form. New York: W. W. Norton. 2000.
  2. Cron, Lisa. Wired for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence. Berkely, CA: Ten Speed Press. 2012.
  3. ______. Story Genius How to Use Brain Science to go Beyond Outlining and Write a Riveting Novel. Berkely, CA: Ten Speed Press. 2016.
  4. Ewalt, David M. Of Dice and Men. New York: Scribner. 2013.
  5. Rettberg, Scott. Electronic Literature. United Kingdom: Polity. 2019.
  6. Witwer, Michael. Empire of Imagination: Gary Gygax and the Birth of Dungeons & Dragons. New York: Bloomsbury. 2016.
  7. Woolley, Benjamin. Virtual Worlds. New York: Penguin. 1994.

Brightman, Hank J., and Melissa K. Dewey. “Trends in modern war gaming: the art of conversation.” Naval War College Review, Winter 2014, 17+. Academic OneFile (accessed May 6, 2017). http://voyager.wnmu.edu:2144/ps/i.do?p=AONE&sw=w&u=nm_a_wnmu&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CA363191716&asid=6cd4cc054215172c142fcae2ab2dd07f.

Brown, Kenneth D. “Modelling for war? Toy soldiers in late Victorian and Edwardian Britain.” Journal of Social History 24, no. 2 (Winter 1990): 237-254. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed May 6, 2017).

Deterding, Sebastian. “Living Room Wars: Remediation, Boardgames, and the Early History of Video Wargaming.” In Joystick Soldiers: The Politics of Play in Military Video Games, edited by Nina B. Huntemann and Matthew Thomas Payne. New York: Routledge, 2009.

Ewalt, David M. Of Dice and Men. New York: Scribner. 2013.

Foley, Robert T. “Preparing the German Army for the First World War: The Operational Ideas of Alfred von Schlieffen and Helmuth von Moltke the Younger.” War & Society 22, no. 2 (October 2004): 1-25.

Glick, Stephen P., and L. Ian Charters. “War, Games, and Military History.” Journal of Contemporary History 18, no. 4 (1983): 567-82. http://www.jstor.org/stable/260304.

Hall, David Ian. “IV. The Modern Model of the Battlefield Tour and Staff Ride: Post‐1815 Prussian and German Traditions.” Defence Studies 5, no. 1 (2005): 37-47.

Lenoir, Tim, and Henry Lowood. “Theaters of War: The Military-Entertainment Complex.” In Collection, Laboratory, Theater: Scenes of Knowledge in the 17th Century, edited by Hekmar Schramm, Ludger Schwarte, and Jan Lazardzig, 427-56. NY: Walter de Gruyter, 2005.

Parlett, David. Parlett's History of Board Games: The Updated Edition of the Oxford History of Board Games. Brattleboro, VT: Echo Point Books & Media, L.L.C., 2018.

Pasanen, Tero. “The Army Game Project—Creating an Artefact of War.” Master’s thesis, University of Jyväskylä, 2009.

Vego, Milan. “German War Gaming.” Naval War College Review 65, no. 4 (2012): 106-147.

Wintjes, Jorit. “Europe’s Earliest Kriegsspiel? Book Seven of Reinhard Graf zu Solms’ Kriegsregierung and the ‘Prehistory’ of Professional War Gaming.” British Journal for Military History 2, no. 1 (2015): 15-33.

Witwer, Michael. Empire of Imagination: Gary Gygax and the Birth of Dungeons & Dragons. New York: Bloomsbury. 2016.